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Q&A with CeCAR Visiting Scholar Erick Lachapelle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
University of Montreal

Website

 

CeCAR Lunch Seminar

Visiting Scholar
Tuesday 19 February, 2019

 

What are you currently researching?
I have a number or research projects going on at the moment. First, I have an on-going interest in studying political debates around carbon pricing. This includes research on what structures opinion on carbon pricing (and climate policy more generally), as well as how different frames and instrument design can influence support. As part of this project, we are conducting a panel study of Canadians this year to examine how the federal government’s policy of returning proceeds from the federal carbon tax to citizens through tax credits will affect support over time. Second, I study public risk perceptions related to climate change, and compare the perceptions of the public to expert assessments of risk (e.g. flood mapping) in Canada. This has led me to develop maps of Canadian climate opinion at the local level (www.umontreal.ca/climat). I’ve also just begun a project with 14 of Canada’s largest environmental groups. We are surveying a random sample of their members (who make up over 1 million Canadians) to examine the pathways to environmental engagement in Canada. We will compare results of this survey with those of a general population study we are running simultaneously.

 

How will your research improve or have a wider impact on society?
The kind of research I do is closely related to actual debates we are having in Canada. It is problem driven. Because of this, I work hard to disseminate the results of our research to a wider audience. This includes policy reports and presentations to decision-makers, insurance companies, and groups working in Canada on issues related to climate change.

 

What do you enjoy most about your research?
I enjoy working collaboratively with other researchers from around the world on common problems the world is facing. I also really enjoy the interdisciplinary aspect of research on climate change. The problem is so complex it demands that we pay attention to science, economics, politics, health and psychology, among other aspects. I find this intellectually stimulating, though it can also be a challenge.

 

What is the most challenging aspect of your research?
The complexity of the climate change problem is challenging. The world is slow to act, despite the fact that solutions are available. So the real challenge is getting people, governments, groups to act on the results of our research. This is really challenging and can be frustrating, but is also drives me to work harder to communicate solutions and best practices that the research community has to offer.

 

You can find our full seminar schedule here.

Quote

"The complexity of the climate change problem is challenging. The world is slow to act, despite the fact that solutions are available. So the real challenge is getting people, governments, groups to act on the results of our research."

Selected Readings

Montpetit, É. and Lachapelle, E. 2015. “Can Policy Actors Learn from Academic Scientists?” Environmental Politics 24(5): 661-680. Read here

Page Manager: Webbredaktionen|Last update: 3/27/2019
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